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  • NGOs complete online NCDs national survey today

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NCD deaths up - slightly up but still up

Written by Vicki Pinkney-Atkinson.

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It’s official NCDs mortality rates are up bucking the slight downward trend in infectious disease death rates.

The good news is that deaths from infective causes are down especially in the light of the AIDS/HIV epidemic and social causes of disease.

However, what we are seeing NCDs death rates going up (as a % of all deaths).

It foreshadows of the wave of NCDs deaths and disability to come.

From 2009 to 2011 the NCDs deaths were up slightly (0.1% and 0.8% of deaths)

  • cerebrovascular disease (strokes, blood vessel disease and the like) from moves from 5th to 3rd place
  • diabetes moves from 6th to 5th place
  • other forms of heart disease stays in 4th place (some of these are infective)
  • hypertensive disease (including heart and kidney failure) stayed in 8th place
  • (COPD, asthma) chronic lower respiratory diseases moves from 9th to 10th place Good move ?

Leading NCDs causes of death also vary according to by sex

Females top 5 NCDs

  • cerebrovascular disease 3rd highest cause
  • other forms of cardiovascular disease 4th highest cause
  • diabetes 5th highest cause
  • hypertensive disease 7th

Males top 3 NCDs deaths

  • other forms of cardiovascular disease 3rd highest
  • cerebrovascular disease 4rd highest cause
  • diabetes 7th highest cause
  • chronic lower respiratory disease 8th place
  • ischaemic heart disease 9th place

It is not easy to extract cancer statistics.

Judge for yourself ---- read the full report from StatisticsSA

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South African NCD Plan 2013 - what is civil society/ NGO role?

Written by Vicki Pinkney-Atkinson.

The Department of Health's Strategic Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases 2013-2017 (2013) is essential reading for patients, health care professionals and service related industries.

icon SA NCDs STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2017 (1.17 MB)

10 targets targets to be met by 2020

1) ? 25% or more the relative premature mortality(under 60 years of age) from NCDs;
2) ? by 20% tobacco use;
3) ? by 20% the relative per capita consumption of alcohol;
4) ? mean population intake of salt to <5 grams/day;
5) ? by 10% the percentage of people who are obese and/or overweight;
6) ? prevalence of physical activity (defined as 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week, or equivalent) by 10% .
7) ? prevalence of people with raised BP by 20% (through lifestyle and medication).
8) Every women with sexually transmitted diseases to be screened for cervical cancer every 5 years if no STD every women to have 3 screens in a lifetime (and as per policy for women who are HIV/AIDS positive).
9) ? the percentage of people controlled for hypertension, diabetes and asthma by 30% in sentinel sites;
10) ? the number of people screened and treated for mental disorder by 30%.

However, of concern is the perception created in the report that civil society only plays a role in the primary prevention of illness and focuses on risk factors (page 38). Admittedly it is the section entitled Role of Civil Society in Promoting Health highlights the civil society role in primary prevention. However, it NGO civil society role is not outlined any where else.

"It is necessary for the public to mobilise for better health through active advocacy and social mobilisation and responsible bodies that are protected from commercial influence have a very important role in promoting population health. Partnerships between government and civil society organisations can contribute considerably to improving health. Where possible joint campaigns can be run, however the independence of CSOs should be maintained for an effective advocacy role. CSOs can assist in ensuring that public policies and practices are in the public interest.

Social mobilisation is essential for addressing the risk factors of NCDs. People must be encouraged to take ownership of their behaviours and choices and the environment should be supportive and enable people to make healthy choices. There should be a process of enabling people to increase their control over the determinants of health and thereby improve their health. CSOs can help people organise and empower people with knowledge to make informed decisions. Awareness campaigns and community education are necessary to improve health literacy and keep people informed of healthier options and / or dangerous practices"

I don't think any of us have a problem with the statements above. However, the quote is the only reference to civil society at any point in the document. The implication is that that is the only PRIMARY PREVENTION in which civil society organisations are involved. .
Primary prevention    (Aka primary prophylaxis)  is aimed at stopping the onset of an illness such as asthma OR diabetes  in healthy people For example preventing prenatal sensitisation to smoke, large antismoking campaigns. Interventions are introduced before the onset of the disease and are designed to reduce its incidence

Secondary prevention and tertiary prevent involves  those health interventions aimed at onset or mild or even severe forms of illness to reduce its impact or to prevent

Does your organisation provide more than preventive care like screening, treatment, palliative care?  We would love to hear from youThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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Salt The Silent Killer

Written by David Pinkney-Atkinson.

Salt has a direct effect on your blood pressure.

The intake of salt causes your body to retain water above normal. This in turn raises your blood pressure. High blood pressure puts your heart, kidneys, arteries and brain under immense strain. This can lead to heart attacks, strokes and kidney problems.

A high intake of salt can cause blood pressure medication not to work as well and in some cases cause it to have no effect. Reduce your salt intake and live a healthier life. Rather than adding salt into your meals use spices and herbs in its place.

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What is the Civil Society National NCD Status Report ?

Written by David Pinkney-Atkinson.

Objective of the CSNNSR is to understand and assess the national response to NCDs written from a civil society advocacy perspective and indentifies progress, good practice and challenges. The CSNNSR is meant to complement and support government official surveillance, monitoring and reporting on NCDs.

The attached document contains the Civil Society National NCD Status Report outline and the NCD benchmarking tool.

The report will be completed in sections according to content, risk, factors and key stakeholder group. The Editor is Prof Harry Dugmore from Rhodes University School of Journalism. Click on the document icon below to download.

If you have any further questions or would like to be involved please contact Vicki Pinkney-Atkinson This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

icon Civil society advocacy report (245.9 kB)

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COPD - Council for Medical Schemes PMB guide

Written by Vicki Pinkney-Atkinson.

The Council for Medical Schemes has recently published a guide for patients on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which is really worth reading.

This guide highlights important facts about the COPD causes and the holistic treatment. Yon use the guide to check that your medical scheme is providing the required level of prevention and management (PMBs or prescribed minimum benefits).  Click here to download.

COPD (chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema) is a leading cause of death in South Africa and follows the global pattern. Compare this document with the SA national COPD guidelines as published in the SA Medical Journal.

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SA NCD Alliance Stakeholder meeting slide presentations for download

Written by David Pinkney-Atkinson.

Presentations below are from the first National NCD Stakeholder meeting held on the 11th and 12th February 2014. The authors have genrously allowed the use of their presentations. Please acknowledge the use of all material.

 

icon 2014 NCD Alliance CANSA profile Sue Janse van Rensburg (1.46 MB)

icon 2014 sA NCD Alliance lessons learnt from AIDS mmt Henry Mkwanazi (547.44 kB)

icon 2014 SA NCD alliance Past, present and future NCD in SA Krisela Steyn (739.32 kB)

icon 2014 NCD Alliance advocacy toolkit including status report and benchmarking tool Katie Dane Cristina Parsons Perez (1.37 MB)

icon 201402 - NCDA_Global NCD epidemic action and challenges Katie Dain (1.9 MB)

icon SA NCD Alliance 2014 lessions learned from Tobacco Advocacy so you want to change the world? Yussuf Saloojee (1.14 MB)

iconsa ncd alliance 2014 Diabetes SA Profile Leigh-Ann Bailie (288.94 kB)

icon SA NCD Alliance 2014 Heart and Stroke Foundation profile Vash Mungal-Singh (1.61 MB)

icon sa ncd alliance 2014 introducing PHANGO and the  SANCD Alliance Vicki Pinkney-Atkinson (546.51 kB)

icon SA NCD ALLIANCE SAs NCD Action Plan strengths & challenges 2014 Mel Freeman (877.43 kB)

 

The presentations remain the property of the authors and the authors must be acknowledged in all use of the material.

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SA NCD Alliance Stakeholder Meeting Picture

Written by Vicki.

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WHO Global NCD Action Plan 2013-2014

Written by Vicki Pinkney-Atkinson.

World Health Assembly endorses NCD Global Action Plan 2013-2020 (GAP)

WHO Global Action Plan for Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020

 

 

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PHANGO and partners win international grant as SA NCD Alliance

Written by Vicki.

NCD Alliance selects National Implementing Partners in South Africa, Brazil and the Caribbean

As part of a new program, ‘Strengthening Health Systems, Supporting NCD Action’, the NCD Alliance has competitively selected National Implementing Partners in the Caribbean region, Brazil and South Africa. ‘Strengthening Health Systems, Supporting NCD Action’ is a program designed to build the capacity of NCD civil society to monitor national progress on NCDs and to advocate for improved NCD policies and the strengthening of health systems.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) – cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory disease - kill approximately 36 million per year, with 80% of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. If current trends continue, this figure is projected to rise to 52 million deaths by 2030.

Governments agreed at the 2013 World Health Assembly to a global monitoring framework with a target to reduce overall preventable NCD mortality by 25% by 2025, and a WHO Global NCD Action Plan 2013-2020. Reaching this target and the ambitions of the Plan will now require significant progress at the country level, through government leadership and robust policies, and a strong NCD civil society presence to hold governments accountable.

In support of these efforts and following a rigorous selection process, the NCD Alliance has selected National Implementing Partners in the Caribbean region,Brazil and South Africa to deliver the ‘Strengthening Health Systems, Supporting NCD Action’ program. The selected partners are:

  • The newly created South African NCD Alliance (SA NCDA)which brings together the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), Diabetes South Africa (DSA), the Heart and Stroke Association of South Africa, the Patient Health Alliance of Non-Governmental Organizations (PHANGO), members respectively of UICC, IDF and WHF;
  • The Healthy Caribbean Coalition (HCC) - a member of the World Heart Federation (WHF);
  • Alliance for Control of Tobacco Use Brazil (ACT) - a member of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.

These local partners in each geographical context have a significant track record in NCD advocacy and coalition building. Each will receive support from the NCD Alliance to build networks of action, conduct national level research to monitor progress on NCDs and identify gaps, develop dialogue with governments and other key stakeholders, and advocate for improved NCD policies, programs and health systems strengthening.

Cary Adams, CEO of UICC and Chair of the NCD Alliance said of the Program and National Implementing Partner selection:“Strengthening Health Systems, Supporting NCD Action’ generously supported by Medtronic Philanthropy, is part of the NCD Alliance’s efforts to translate global commitments into national action by building the capacity of civil society. The National Implementing Partners we have selected in the Caribbean region, Brazil and South Africa will play a key role in supporting their Governments meet their global commitments. They will also provide us with valuable lessons and best practices to export globally.”

“The NCD Alliance congratulates the National Implementing Partners on their selection and we look forward to working together to inspire change for the millions of people at risk or living with NCDs today”.

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Prevention and Control of NCDs: Guidelines for Primary Health Care in Low-Resource Settings

Written by Vicki.

New WHO document that focuses on evidence-based care in low-resource settings. Target audience health professionals.

Diabetes type 2, asthma and COPD.

Click here to download document

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